William Blake's Jerusalem Explained.

Chapter 3: Plate 62

Repose on me till the morning of the Grave, I am thy life.

Jerusalem replied. I am an outcast: Albion is dead!
I am left to the trampling foot & the spurning heel!
A Harlot I am calld. I am sold from street to street!
I am defaced with blows & with the dirt of the Prison!
And wilt thou become my Husband O my Lord & Saviour?
Shall Vala bring thee forth! shall the Chaste be ashamed also?
I see the Maternal Line, I behold the Seed of the Woman!
Cainah, & Ada & Zillah & Naamah Wife of Noah.
Shuahs daughter & Tamar & Rahab the Canaanites;
Ruth the Moabite & Bathsheba of the daughters of Heth
Naamah the Ammonite, Zibeah the Philistine. & Mary
These are the Daughters of Vala, Mother of the Body of death
But I thy Magdalen behold thy Spiritual Risen Body
Shall Albion arise? I know he shall arise at the Last Day,
I know that in my flesh I shall see God: but Emanations
Are weak. they know not whence they are, nor whither tend.

Jesus replied. I am the Resurrection & the Life.
I Die & pass the limits of possibility. as it appears
To individual perception, Luvah must be Created
And Vala; for I cannot leave them in the gnawing Grave.
But will prepare a way for my banished-ones to return
Come now with me into the villages, walk thro all the cities.
Tho thou art taken to prison & judgment, starved in the streets
I will command the cloud to give thee food & the hard rock
To flow with milk & wine, tho thou seest me not a season
Even a long season & a hard journey & a howling wilderness;
Tho Valas cloud hide thee & Luvahs fires follow thee:
Only believe & trust in me, Lo. I am always with thee;

So spoke the Lamb of God while Luvahs Cloud reddening above
Burst forth in streams of blood upon the heavens & dark night
Involvd Jerusalem. & the Wheels of Albions Sons turnd hoarse
Over the Mountains & the fires blaz'd on Druid Altars
And the Sun set in Tyburns Brook where Victims howl & cry,

But Los beheld the Divine Vision among the flames of the Furnaces
Therefore he lived & breathed in hope. but his tears fell incessant
Because his Children were closd from him apart; & Enitharmon
Dividing in fierce pain; also the Vision of God was closd in clouds
Of Albions Spectres, that Los in despair oft sat, & often ponderd
On Death Eternal in fierce shudders upon the mountains of Albion
Walking: & in the vales in howlings fierce, then to his Anvils
Turning, anew began his labours, tho in terrible pains:

Plate 62: Analysis.

Repose on me till the morning of the Grave, I am thy life.

Jerusalem replied. I am an outcast: Albion is dead!
I am left to the trampling foot & the spurning heel!
A Harlot I am calld. I am sold from street to street!
I am defaced with blows & with the dirt of the Prison!
And wilt thou become my Husband O my Lord & Saviour?
Shall Vala bring thee forth! shall the Chaste be ashamed also?
I see the Maternal Line, I behold the Seed of the Woman!
Cainah, & Ada & Zillah & Naamah Wife of Noah.
Shuahs daughter & Tamar & Rahab the Canaanites;
Ruth the Moabite & Bathsheba of the daughters of Heth
Naamah the Ammonite, Zibeah the Philistine. & Mary
These are the Daughters of Vala, Mother of the Body of death
But I thy Magdalen behold thy Spiritual Risen Body
Shall Albion arise? I know he shall arise at the Last Day,
I know that in my flesh I shall see God: but Emanations
Are weak. they know not whence they are, nor whither tend.

Jesus replied. I am the Resurrection & the Life.

1-18

Thus, finitude rests in Christ: "Repose on me till the morning of the Grave. I am thy life" he says, for now being is revealed as infinite in Christ's eternal life, and darkness become light in "the morning of the Grave". Jerusalem, however, drawn within, "is outcast" in the starry wheels and mills of finite reproduction, for "Albion is dead". His energies are inverted to self-predatory negation, and she is emptied, she "is left to the trampling foot & the spurning heel". Called "Harlot", she is "sold from street to street" and "defaced with blows & with the dirt of the Prison". Sexually shamed, physically abused and reduced to mere survival, she is polluted beyond any possible marriage: "And wilt thou become my Husband O my Lord & Saviour?"

In Chapter 1, as noted, Jerusalem recalled she was bride and wife of the Lamb in "virgin loveliness/The Lamb of God reciev'd" her "in his arms" and made her "his Bride and Wife" (1: 20; 38-40). This pre-lapsarian state of being will be restored when Albion re-awakens in Christ.

Here, Jerusalem sees the ruin of fertility, "Shall Vala bring thee forth" she asks, for feminine formative potencies are seduced into prostitution and debased fertility religions, and masculine energies are concentrated into debased systems of moral law, war and human sacrifice. Thus, she asks if the pure of vision are also debased: are the "Chaste" to be "ashamed also" that God is born of debased sexual woman she asks rhetorically. Jerusalem can "see the Maternal Line" stretching in her visionary history from "Cainah" to "Mary". She sees the chaste become the mother of God. Her visionary grasp of reproduction and fertility sees "the Seed of the Woman" who are "the Daughters of Vala". Further, Jerusalem sees that in the finite the goddess of nature is Vala who therefore is the "Mother of the Body of death", for she weaves human forms; born to die. Christ's human body dies. The infinite and finite are reconciled in the Divine kenosis, and Jerusalem, his "Magdalen", can "behold" Christ's resurrected life, his "Spiritual Risen Body".

She knows Albion "shall arise at the Last Day", for she knows "that in" her "flesh" she "shall see God". But Jerusalem is in finitude, suffering, for she is without direction or self-belief. She believes she is a dependent, secondary order of being; that "Emanations", as formative energies that give shape and form to masculine energies, "Are weak". Thus, as a consequence of Albion's self-exile and death, Jerusalem believes she is without clear purpose, with no clear past, or immediate future, and so she says emanations "know not whence they are, nor wither tend". As symbolised by Albion and Jerusalem, masculine without feminine means alienation and death for the zoa; and feminine without masculine, as Jerusalem experiences here, means emptiness and dissipation for the emanation. For Blake, in Christ all generative sexual division is reconciled and male and female energies realise each in each other in the bosom of Christ.

I Die & pass the limits of possibility. as it appears
To individual perception, Luvah must be Created
And Vala; for I cannot leave them in the gnawing Grave.
But will prepare a way for my banished-ones to return
Come now with me into the villages, walk thro all the cities.
Tho thou art taken to prison & judgment, starved in the streets
I will command the cloud to give thee food & the hard rock
To flow with milk & wine, tho thou seest me not a season
Even a long season & a hard journey & a howling wilderness;
Tho Valas cloud hide thee & Luvahs fires follow thee:
Only believe & trust in me, Lo. I am always with thee;

18-29

In Blake's Christian epic, Jesus is salvation: "I am the Resurrection & the life" Jesus reveals to Jerusalem, "I die & pass the limits of possibility as it appears/To individual perception". Christ is ultimate reality: "I Die & pass the limits of possibility, as it appears/To individual perception", for resurrected, he will resurrect the cleansed Albion. However, Albion's mundane passions, Luvah and Vala, must exhaust the possibilities of finite life: "Luvah must be Created/And Vala" for Christ's salvic love "cannot leave them in the gnawing Grave". Christ promises he "will prepare a way for" his "banished ones to return". Luvah and Vala will exhaust their illusions of autonomy and be saved from the "gnawing Grave" of eternal death. As component energies their reconciled return is a prerequisite of Albion's reconciliation as a whole.

Christ determines Jerusalem's finite destiny after the incarnation until Albion is cleansed. She will accompany Christ in "the villages" and "walk thro all the cities" of Albion's interior energies. Though in "prison & judgement" and "starved in the streets", Christ "will command the cloud to give" her "food & the hard rock/To flow with milk & wine".

Her suffering is in formative reciprocity to the ruined emotional and sexual inner world of Albion. The vortex in the world of Generation is reversed, and this world will be re-created by Christ. Yet error must take form, and so promises he will save her until error emerges. Jerusalem must exist in faith until then: "Tho" she "seest" him "not a season"/Even a long season & a hard journey & a howling universe" and even though "Valas cloud hide" her "& Luvah's fires follow" her, yet she must "only believe & trust" in Christ for he is "always with her". That is the Divine promise.

So spoke the Lamb of God while Luvahs Cloud reddening above
Burst forth in streams of blood upon the heavens & dark night
Involvd Jerusalem. & the Wheels of Albions Sons turnd hoarse
Over the Mountains & the fires blaz'd on Druid Altars
And the Sun set in Tyburns Brook where Victims howl & cry,

30-34

After the incarnation, the words of the "Lamb of God" accompany "Luvah's Clouds reddening above" which, energised and closed within Albion, in turn implode and "Burst forth in streams of blood upon the heavens" of Albion's interior landscape. Immediately, Jerusalem is left lightless in "dark night", the "wheels of Albion's Sons turnd hoarse", "fires blaz'd on druid Altars" and the "Sun set in Tyburns Brook where Victims howl & cry". The world is enflamed; it will exhaust itself in self-consumption.

But Los beheld the Divine Vision among the flames of the Furnaces
Therefore he lived & breathed in hope. but his tears fell incessant
Because his Children were closd from him apart; & Enitharmon
Dividing in fierce pain; also the Vision of God was closd in clouds
Of Albions Spectres, that Los in despair oft sat, & often ponderd
On Death Eternal in fierce shudders upon the mountains of Albion
Walking: & in the vales in howlings fierce, then to his Anvils
Turning, anew began his labours, tho in terrible pains:

35-42

Blake returns to the perspective of the opening plates of Chapter 3 where "the Divine Vision like a silent Sun appeard above" the "gardens of Kensington/On Tyburns River in clouds of blood"(1: 29; 1-5). Now, after the incarnation, these clouds unleash the infused potencies of Luvah's mundane passion, and, at the centre of the axis created, "Los beheld the Divine Vision among the flames of the Furnaces". Again, Blake's symbol of the furnace draws upon Daniel. The vortex of Albion's collapse is reversed. Finite energy pours down on Los from the circumference downward upon the furnace at the centre. At the same time, the redemptive vortex of infinite energy radiates outward from the Divine vision in the furnaces at the centre to the Divine vision at the circumference.

Thus Los "lived & breathed in hope, but his tears fell incessant". In the divided component energies of Albion's collapsed consciousness, Los' "Children were closd from him apart: & Enitharmon/Dividing in fierce pain". Blake consistently describes the impact of division upon the entities of his myth. In Chapter 1, after Golgonooza was built and spectre hardened into a "distorted & reversed reflexion in the Darkness/And in the Non Entity", Enitharmon "divided away/In gnawing pain from Los' bosom in the deadly night"(1: 17; 49-50). Here, the vortex of the world of Generation expands outward from this division between zoa, spectre and emanation "the Vision of God" seeming to be "closd" up "in clouds/Of Albions Spectres", for error is hardening into negation to be cast out.

Los, living in faith, "in despair oft sat, & often ponderd/On Death Eternal in fierce shudders upon the mountains of Albion". He works in faith for he is the prophetic voice and redemptive fabricator of finite being: "then to his Anvils/Turning, anew began his labours, tho in terrible pains". Christ has revealed Luvah and Vala must be created to save them from the grave.